Mice

Mice

The House Mouse, and sometimes the Long-Tailed Field Mouse, seek the warmth and shelter of buildings for nesting sites and food. Their presence is usually detected from their dark-coloured droppings or damage to stored foods in the larder, packaging or woodwork.

Mice become sexually mature in eight to ten weeks, and a pair may produce eight litters, each of 16 young, in a year. That means 2000 in a year.

They climb well and can squeeze through very small gaps. They have a compulsive need to gnaw in order to keep their incisor teeth worn down to a constant length. Electric cables, water and gas pipes, packaging and woodwork may all be seriously damaged by mice – many instances of electrical fires and floods have been attributed to them. They contaminate far more food than they consume and they are capable of carrying many diseases, particularly food poisoning pathogens. The average mouse deposits 30 – 70 droppings in 24 hours and urinates frequently to mark its territory.

Mice are erratic, sporadic feeders, nibbling at many sources of food rather than taking repeated meals from any one item. They do not need free water to drink as they normally obtain sufficient moisture from their food.

How we can help:

We can treat mice with anti-coagulant poisons that are put in tamper proof boxes in areas that children and pets have access to. We also use traditional trapping systems.

Before our visit
  • Please move furniture etc. to allow us access to your loft space.
  • If the problem is in the kitchen, please ensure we can get access under your kitchen units.
  • If the problem is in the bathroom, please ensure we can get access under your bath.
During our visit

If we can retrieve mice that have died then we will, but sometimes this is not possible.

After our visit
  • Please clean up all droppings that were found at the visit, so that we know if the problem is on – going.
  • If we can retrieve mice that have died then we will, but sometimes this is not possible.

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Memberships & Affiliations

british pest control associationbritish pest control associationbritish pest control associationbritish pest control association